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English Woodlands Burrow Nursery Blog

  • Old England in the fall - our selection of Trees for Autumn colour

    Acer japonicum AconitifoliumAcer palmatum species – have many leaf shapes and shades turning stunning autumn colours from yellow, through orange, red to scarlet.  They prefer sheltered and at least partly shaded sites with moist but well-drained soil.

    AmelanchierAll Amelanchier species have good autumn colour whether grown as a shrub or tree, aswell as small white flowers in spring.
    A. arborea Robin Hill is the largest we sell reaching 5-10m eventually. A. Ballerina and Snowflakes are ideal for a small garden reaching approximately 6m. Autumn colour is best on neutral to acid soils – not chalk!

    Cercis Forest PansyCercis canadensis Forest Pansy – a shrub or small tree with purple leaves in summer and an attractive range of yellow to orange mixed with purple autumn colour – beautiful with the low evening sun behind it. Prefers a sunny sheltered site.

    Crataegus prunifoliaCrataegus prunifolia - a round crowned tree reaching 5-7m with bright red berries and yellow to orange autumn colour – in a good year this can be stunning. This is a hardy tree tolerant of most sites and soil types.

    Wild cherryOrnamental cherries –As well as spring flowers most ornamental cherries also have some autumn colour – most notable are Prunus sargentii, Prunus subhirtella Autumnalis (which also flowers throughout the winter when the weather is mild enough), Prunus avium the wild cherry, and Prunus Royal Burgundy with burgundy colour leaves in summer turning to bright red in autumn.

    Sweet gumLiquidambar styraciflua and species – beautiful maple shape green leaves turn mixture of colours from yellow, pink, orange, red to deep wine red.
    A wonderful specimen tree for autumn colour. Can also be pruned into an espalier for stunning screening.

    Persian IronwoodParrotia persica – Persian Ironwood – an unusual tree with small red flowers appearing before the leaves in March, often multi-stemmed or with low branches that show off the often multi-coloured autumn leaves from orange-red to violet tinged scarlet.

    Scarlet oakQuercus – oak varieties with good autumn colour include pin oak, scarlet oak and red oak. Large trees with deeply lobed leaves and a range of colour from rusty brown to bright scarlet oaks.

     

    Sorbus aucuparia varieties have good foliage colour as well as berries in the autumn making them doubly attractive. Sorbus commixta the Japanese rowan turns yellow to deep coral-red in autumn the variety Olympic Flame is one we highly recommend.

    Trees with golden autumn colour include Liriodendron - the tulip tree, Acer campestre - field maple, Tilia species - limes and Gleditsia.

  • Have you caught Rugby World Cup Fever Yet?

    Whatever your team, there are trees that come from there

    Oak treeEngland can stand tall with the mighty oak or bend gracefully with the silver birch...not to mention Australia sporting towering Eucalyptus and the versatile evergreen Pittosporum.

    Ornamental cherry treeJapan boasts beautiful flowering cherry trees most of which have stunning autumn colour too – and Japanese Maples are renowned for beautiful autumn foliage.

    From Scotland comes our only native pine - Pinus sylvestris. Ireland shares many of the same native trees as England does - such as Alder (Alnus glutinosa) and bird cherry (Prunus padus). Wales has one of the oldest, if not the oldest native Yew tree in Europe.
    Romania has beautiful forests of oak, hornbeam and beech.

    Olive TreeWe love native trees at English Woodlands, but where would our gardens be without some of the more exotic ornamental trees and shrubs from around the world? Tree ferns from New Zealand, Pencil Cypress and Olive trees from Italy; the amazing monkey puzzle tree Araucaria aurucana comes from Argentina (as well as Chile!) and a wealth of trees come from the USA -from the giant Wellingtonia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) to the autumn splendour of Sweet gum (Liquidambar styraciflua).

    From South Africa comes the essential seaside shrub Tamarix. If you support Canada then you’ll be flying the flag with a Canadian Maple. Think palms and bamboo in Fiji/South Pacific and the world tour is almost complete!Bamboo

  • Questionnaire Voucher Winner

    Thank you to everyone who filled in a questionnaire in the nursery in the Spring.

    Mrs Bowie won the £25 English Woodlands voucher and recently came in to collect her Azaleas.

    Voucher winner

    When you visit us do fill in a questionnaire and your name will be entered in the next draw for a voucher.

  • See us at the Wood Fair!

    If you're heading to the Bentley Wood Fair 18-20th September, don't forget to drop by our stand and say hello - we hope to see you there.

    Wood Fair 2015 Bentley Wood Fair 2015

     

     

     

  • New stock has arrived!

    Autumn is in the air and new stock has arrived!

    Small ornamental TreesWe hope you've had a good summer and are looking forward to the new planting season. Autumn is just round the corner - and with some autumn rain comes ideal planting conditions we hope! Whether you are looking for one specimen or a complete planting plan, a single tree or a whole new hedge we have some great stock in the nursery.    We aim to supply any tree planting accessories you need to help establish your plants; such as stakes, ties, compost, fertiliser, watering pipes and mycorrhizae.
    See our full range of planting accessories here. 

  • Summer News

    We’re back! It’s been a busy year at English Woodlands. We have an updated website,  two new members of staff and are looking forward to the new autumn season.

    Simon JohnsonSimon Johnson joins the senior management team as Commercial Manager and Buyer. He comes with a wealth of experience and aims to continuously improve our website making the whole experience of browsing a pleasure and ordering easy! He will also be ensuring we maintain a top quality despatch and delivery service.

    Jess McCombieJess McCombie is a very welcome addition to the Nursery Sales Team advising customers and keeping the nursery looking great. Jess has a variety of both gardening and retail experience.

    During autumn to spring the traditional tree and hedge planting season is always busy, but during the summer there is still plenty to do! We have been busy on the nursery - watering, feeding and pruning. Topiary has been clipped, flowering hydrangeas are looking great, deciduous trees are in full leaf and it is an ideal time for planning autumn planting.

     

    Hydrangea Vanilla Fraise Hydrangea Vanilla Fraise

     

    We’ll be back to tell you when new stock arrives in the nursery this autumn and keep you posted about any special offers…

  • New Autumn Stock Arrives at the Nursery

    September is always an exciting time here at English Woodlands, as traditionally, the best time for planting is from autumn to spring. The soil is still warm, and as soon as there is sufficient moisture, planting conditions become ideal. Deciduous trees will also lose their leaves and go dormant for the winter, making them much easier to transplant, while evergreen plant’s growth slows down as they prepare for the winter.

    We also restock this time of year, replenishing our selection of fruit and ornamental trees, shrubs and climbers, meaning that we always have a great range of plants at this time of year. The leaves are still on the trees, so it is helpful to see them and plan for later planting.

    We are spoilt for choice with our new arrivals. A few examples of our superb quality trees are the tall Liquidambar styracifluar which will look amazing when autumn colour comes, Rhododendrons and Azaleas which are budding up now to be ready for spring next year.

    Liquidambar styraciflua - Sweet Gum Liquidambar styraciflua - Sweet Gum
    Rhododendrons English Woodland's new stock of Rhododendrons

    In addition to our trees and shrubs, we always have something special to offer. This year we have some wonderful Ilex Crenata large bonsai trees that have been cloud pruned. And Ilex crenata is an evergreen pant that is slow growing and easily clipped to maintain shape.

    We at English Woodlands love the Ilex Nellie Stevens, and it is a slightly less prickly plant than the common holly Ilex Acquilfolium. We have some very large standard trees in stock at the moment, and they would make a fabulous tree for a smart entrance as well as providing evergreen screening where required. Other new additions are some great Cornus controversa variegata, which have reached the size where they start to look very special!

    Ilex Nellie Stevens - Holly Nellie Stevens Ilex Nellie Stevens - Holly Nellie Stevens

    Many of our customers comment on the great quality of our plants, which we always greatly appreciate, and our ever-popular evergreen hedge plants such as the Common Laurel and the Portuguese laurel are looking great in our nursery.

    Whether it is a small fruit tree, a large standard tree or hedge plants you are looking for; whether you need screening structure or just something ornamental to enjoy we have some great plants for you to look at in the nursery just now. Autumn – we love it!

    If you want to talk to any of English Woodland’s friendly team for advice regarding tour new stock or any of our other products, give them a call on 01435 862992, or visit their website at www.ewburrownursery.co.uk.

  • Free Single Stake Pack with a Small Ornamental or Fruit Tree (September)

    For the remainder of September, English Woodlands shall be offering our customers a FREE single stake pack when they purchase their choice of a small (175-200cm) ornamental tree or fruit tree Online.

    Comprising of a stake, tie and rabbit guard, the stake pack is a vital accessory when planting your ornamental or fruit tree to ensure that it grows securely.

    Perfect for our fruit trees or small standard trees, the stake pack will give your tree the protection and stability it requires in the first few years while it establishes itself.

    You can take advantage of this offer by ordering your choice of a small ornamental or fruit tree Online, and we will send you a stake pack of the appropriate size.

    To see the promotion on our website, click here or to view our wider range of planting accessories, look here. If you want to talk to any of English Woodland’s friendly team for further advice regarding the free stake pack or any of our other products, give them a call on 01435 862992, or visit their website at www.ewburrownursery.co.uk.

    Single Stake Pack Single Stake Pack Free With Small Ornamental or Fruit Tree
  • 2014: A Fruitful Year for Fruit Trees

    After a long wet winter, most areas in the UK have enjoyed a long warm growing season with plenty of sunshine, albeit between the showers! It so happens that these are perfect conditions for fruit trees. At blossom time the weather was generally warm and dry, which has meant a good fruit set in spring. Now, the fruit is ripening, and gardeners can begin to harvest the top fruit.

    However, it is not as simple as just picking the fruit off the trees. There is a right way to go about collecting your fruit, and different fruits must be picked at different times. Plums must be picked as soon as they are ready (and before the wasps get to them) when they are soft to the touch. Apples should be sweet and crunchy and pears must be firm but sweet before they are picked. Windfall from apple trees is often a good indicator of readiness.

    In order to know whether it is the right time to start picking, it is a good idea to take a sample or two first so you know when to start the harvest. If you pick too early, the fruit will not have properly developed and therefore will not be as tasty as possible, but if you pick the fruit too late, it will not keep as well.

    Fruit currently being harvested includes plums, damsons and gages, all of which can be cooked in crumbles and tarts or made into jams. They can even be frozen until winter to save yourself a taste of summer. Figs are also ready to harvest, while medlars and quinces are not far away.

    Harvest times vary from year to year depending on the locality, but this year has seen a trend of top fruit ripening early. In order to make the most from your fruit trees, you must pick the fruit as it ripens. If top fruit is ripening early, picking the fruit from the top first is best. It is also important to pick fruit on a dry day, as moist conditions can cause fruit to spoil faster.

    Plum Victoria, Ripe Fruit Victoria Plums ripe and ready to pick!
    Cambridge Gage, Ripe Fruit, Ripe Gage Cambridge Gages ripening

    For any more tips on harvesting fruit trees, or for any general inquiries, please get in touch with us. The knowledgeable English Woodlands team are available Monday-Friday on 01485 862992, or you can leave an inquiry on our contact page and our team will gladly get back to you. 

  • Attract Bees to your Garden with Ornamental trees

    Whether you like them or not, bees are of critical importance to our environment: they are pollinators for fruit and vegetable crops, and they are producers of honey and other medicinal foods.

    Unfortunately, with the global bee population in decline due to habitat and disease problems, the pollination of fruit trees and cultivation of fruit and vegetables is in jeopardy. Yet garden owners can do something small to counter this, by planting a number of ornamental/fruit trees in their back garden to attract bees, helping them on their way to provide vital food sources and to keep our fruit-bearing trees pollinated.

    Firstly, you may want to be aware that certain flowers are more accommodating to bees than others. Single flowers tend to be your best bet, as they are larger, and therefore more accessible for insects to find the nectar and pollen. In contrast, many double flowered plants do not produce nectar at all.

    It also may be worth maintaining a varied seasonal plan, in which your flowering season stretches from early spring to the very last days of summer. If you plant too early, there is a large chance the pollen will be all used up in a short space of time. Aiming for what we might call ‘staggered interest’, with a variety of perennial plants, will see the flowering season extend from early spring right up until the end of summer, giving the bees a great deal of support over the longest period of time.

    In terms of suitable species for attracting bees to your garden, English Woodlands has a number of suggestions:

    • Spring – ornamental crab apples and pears, such as Malus and Pyrus species
    • Early flowering Cherries such as Prunus cerasifera Nigra
    • Hawthorns such as Crataegus prunifolia and Crataegus Monogyna

    As for summer flowering trees, Tilia lime trees are certainly attractive to bees (although some species are more so than others, for instance, some have a soporific, almost narcotic effect).

    In late spring and early summer, shrubs such as Elder and Cotoneaster cornubia are valuable sources of nectar, while climbers such as Honeysuckle will all variety before the autumn.

    Finally, as late summer gives way to autumn, Arbutus unedo, a strawberry tree, has both flowers used as a pollen source for bees and fruits for birds, while the shrub Elaeagnus ebbingei has small white fragrant flowers, making it a bee-friendly option as a hedge plant.

    arbutus enedo

    For any more tips on which trees are best for attracting bees to your garden, or for any general inquiries, please get in touch with us. The knowledgeable English Woodlands team are available Monday-Friday on 01435 862992, or you can leave an inquiry on our contact page and our team will gladly get back to you.

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