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English Woodlands Burrow Nursery Blog

  • Summer News

    We’re back! It’s been a busy year at English Woodlands. We have an updated website,  two new members of staff and are looking forward to the new autumn season.

    Simon JohnsonSimon Johnson joins the senior management team as Commercial Manager and Buyer. He comes with a wealth of experience and aims to continuously improve our website making the whole experience of browsing a pleasure and ordering easy! He will also be ensuring we maintain a top quality despatch and delivery service.

    Jess McCombieJess McCombie is a very welcome addition to the Nursery Sales Team advising customers and keeping the nursery looking great. Jess has a variety of both gardening and retail experience.

    During autumn to spring the traditional tree and hedge planting season is always busy, but during the summer there is still plenty to do! We have been busy on the nursery - watering, feeding and pruning. Topiary has been clipped, flowering hydrangeas are looking great, deciduous trees are in full leaf and it is an ideal time for planning autumn planting.

     

    Hydrangea Vanilla Fraise Hydrangea Vanilla Fraise

     

    We’ll be back to tell you when new stock arrives in the nursery this autumn and keep you posted about any special offers…

  • New Autumn Stock Arrives at the Nursery

    September is always an exciting time here at English Woodlands, as traditionally, the best time for planting is from autumn to spring. The soil is still warm, and as soon as there is sufficient moisture, planting conditions become ideal. Deciduous trees will also lose their leaves and go dormant for the winter, making them much easier to transplant, while evergreen plant’s growth slows down as they prepare for the winter.

    We also restock this time of year, replenishing our selection of fruit and ornamental trees, shrubs and climbers, meaning that we always have a great range of plants at this time of year. The leaves are still on the trees, so it is helpful to see them and plan for later planting.

    We are spoilt for choice with our new arrivals. A few examples of our superb quality trees are the tall Liquidambar styracifluar which will look amazing when autumn colour comes, Rhododendrons and Azaleas which are budding up now to be ready for spring next year.

    Liquidambar styraciflua - Sweet Gum Liquidambar styraciflua - Sweet Gum
    Rhododendrons English Woodland's new stock of Rhododendrons

    In addition to our trees and shrubs, we always have something special to offer. This year we have some wonderful Ilex Crenata large bonsai trees that have been cloud pruned. And Ilex crenata is an evergreen pant that is slow growing and easily clipped to maintain shape.

    We at English Woodlands love the Ilex Nellie Stevens, and it is a slightly less prickly plant than the common holly Ilex Acquilfolium. We have some very large standard trees in stock at the moment, and they would make a fabulous tree for a smart entrance as well as providing evergreen screening where required. Other new additions are some great Cornus controversa variegata, which have reached the size where they start to look very special!

    Ilex Nellie Stevens - Holly Nellie Stevens Ilex Nellie Stevens - Holly Nellie Stevens

    Many of our customers comment on the great quality of our plants, which we always greatly appreciate, and our ever-popular evergreen hedge plants such as the Common Laurel and the Portuguese laurel are looking great in our nursery.

    Whether it is a small fruit tree, a large standard tree or hedge plants you are looking for; whether you need screening structure or just something ornamental to enjoy we have some great plants for you to look at in the nursery just now. Autumn – we love it!

    If you want to talk to any of English Woodland’s friendly team for advice regarding tour new stock or any of our other products, give them a call on 01435 862992, or visit their website at www.ewburrownursery.co.uk.

  • Free Single Stake Pack with a Small Ornamental or Fruit Tree (September)

    For the remainder of September, English Woodlands shall be offering our customers a FREE single stake pack when they purchase their choice of a small (175-200cm) ornamental tree or fruit tree Online.

    Comprising of a stake, tie and rabbit guard, the stake pack is a vital accessory when planting your ornamental or fruit tree to ensure that it grows securely.

    Perfect for our fruit trees or small standard trees, the stake pack will give your tree the protection and stability it requires in the first few years while it establishes itself.

    You can take advantage of this offer by ordering your choice of a small ornamental or fruit tree Online, and we will send you a stake pack of the appropriate size.

    To see the promotion on our website, click here or to view our wider range of planting accessories, look here. If you want to talk to any of English Woodland’s friendly team for further advice regarding the free stake pack or any of our other products, give them a call on 01435 862992, or visit their website at www.ewburrownursery.co.uk.

    Single Stake Pack Single Stake Pack Free With Small Ornamental or Fruit Tree
  • 2014: A Fruitful Year for Fruit Trees

    After a long wet winter, most areas in the UK have enjoyed a long warm growing season with plenty of sunshine, albeit between the showers! It so happens that these are perfect conditions for fruit trees. At blossom time the weather was generally warm and dry, which has meant a good fruit set in spring. Now, the fruit is ripening, and gardeners can begin to harvest the top fruit.

    However, it is not as simple as just picking the fruit off the trees. There is a right way to go about collecting your fruit, and different fruits must be picked at different times. Plums must be picked as soon as they are ready (and before the wasps get to them) when they are soft to the touch. Apples should be sweet and crunchy and pears must be firm but sweet before they are picked. Windfall from apple trees is often a good indicator of readiness.

    In order to know whether it is the right time to start picking, it is a good idea to take a sample or two first so you know when to start the harvest. If you pick too early, the fruit will not have properly developed and therefore will not be as tasty as possible, but if you pick the fruit too late, it will not keep as well.

    Fruit currently being harvested includes plums, damsons and gages, all of which can be cooked in crumbles and tarts or made into jams. They can even be frozen until winter to save yourself a taste of summer. Figs are also ready to harvest, while medlars and quinces are not far away.

    Harvest times vary from year to year depending on the locality, but this year has seen a trend of top fruit ripening early. In order to make the most from your fruit trees, you must pick the fruit as it ripens. If top fruit is ripening early, picking the fruit from the top first is best. It is also important to pick fruit on a dry day, as moist conditions can cause fruit to spoil faster.

    Plum Victoria, Ripe Fruit Victoria Plums ripe and ready to pick!
    Cambridge Gage, Ripe Fruit, Ripe Gage Cambridge Gages ripening

    For any more tips on harvesting fruit trees, or for any general inquiries, please get in touch with us. The knowledgeable English Woodlands team are available Monday-Friday on 01485 862992, or you can leave an inquiry on our contact page and our team will gladly get back to you. 

  • Attract Bees to your Garden with Ornamental trees

    Whether you like them or not, bees are of critical importance to our environment: they are pollinators for fruit and vegetable crops, and they are producers of honey and other medicinal foods.

    Unfortunately, with the global bee population in decline due to habitat and disease problems, the pollination of fruit trees and cultivation of fruit and vegetables is in jeopardy. Yet garden owners can do something small to counter this, by planting a number of ornamental/fruit trees in their back garden to attract bees, helping them on their way to provide vital food sources and to keep our fruit-bearing trees pollinated.

    Firstly, you may want to be aware that certain flowers are more accommodating to bees than others. Single flowers tend to be your best bet, as they are larger, and therefore more accessible for insects to find the nectar and pollen. In contrast, many double flowered plants do not produce nectar at all.

    It also may be worth maintaining a varied seasonal plan, in which your flowering season stretches from early spring to the very last days of summer. If you plant too early, there is a large chance the pollen will be all used up in a short space of time. Aiming for what we might call ‘staggered interest’, with a variety of perennial plants, will see the flowering season extend from early spring right up until the end of summer, giving the bees a great deal of support over the longest period of time.

    In terms of suitable species for attracting bees to your garden, English Woodlands has a number of suggestions:

    • Spring – ornamental crab apples and pears, such as Malus and Pyrus species
    • Early flowering Cherries such as Prunus cerasifera Nigra
    • Hawthorns such as Crataegus prunifolia and Crataegus Monogyna

    As for summer flowering trees, Tilia lime trees are certainly attractive to bees (although some species are more so than others, for instance, some have a soporific, almost narcotic effect).

    In late spring and early summer, shrubs such as Elder and Cotoneaster cornubia are valuable sources of nectar, while climbers such as Honeysuckle will all variety before the autumn.

    Finally, as late summer gives way to autumn, Arbutus unedo, a strawberry tree, has both flowers used as a pollen source for bees and fruits for birds, while the shrub Elaeagnus ebbingei has small white fragrant flowers, making it a bee-friendly option as a hedge plant.

    arbutus enedo

    For any more tips on which trees are best for attracting bees to your garden, or for any general inquiries, please get in touch with us. The knowledgeable English Woodlands team are available Monday-Friday on 01435 862992, or you can leave an inquiry on our contact page and our team will gladly get back to you.

  • Read Our Selection of the Best Trees For Screening to Protect your Privacy….

    One of the most common problems we hear about our customers’ gardens are their  ‘next door nightmares’ – a term some apply to the likes of unsightly extensions, overlooking windows from other houses, and even trampolines (and trampolining children!)

    The summertime is the time when many of you will have the chance to enjoy your garden in peace and seclusion. Ensuring you have the background you want during the summer season is something well worth planning in advance for.

    Although Autumn to Spring is the traditional tree-planting season, here at the nursery we receive enquiries all year round about screening – and summer is certainly an ideal time to plan for autumn planting.

    We have plenty of screening solutions that will suit your garden preferences, whether you simply want a bit of privacy, if you want to create a haven for wildlife or even if you want to create your own artistic paradise.

     

    Evergreen Trees and Hedge Plants

    When our customers come seeking screening solutions, evergreen plants tend to be a popular choice, due to their year-round endurance.

    Evergreen conifers such as Cupresssocyparis x leylandii (Leyland) are great fast growing plant with thick foliage, that can work well if pruned regularly.

    Thuja plicata (Western Red Cedar) is a great alternative that you can trim back hard if necessary and it will still regrow.

     

    Alternative Evergreen Options

    Photinia Red Robin and Prunus Lusitanica (Portuguese laurel) are non-conifer evergreens that can achieve a total 5-6m in height, they are hardy and popular hedge plants that many of our customers also grow as standard trees.

    Other non-conifer evergreens include:

    Laurus nobilis (Bay) - great in a sunny well-drained site, and very pruneable

    Ilex (Holly) – a hardy and wind tolerant tree

    Arbutus unedo (Strawberry Tree)

    Cotoneaster cornubia (Semi-evergreen)

     

    Deciduous trees

    The advantage of using deciduous trees for screening is that there is a lot more variety available. Many of these trees grow quickly, and add foliage, flower and fruit interest.

    Although they lose their leaves, some deciduous trees and hedges have screening advantages. For example, trees that keep their leaves well into autumn such as Crataegus lavallei and Pyrus Chanticleer still give screening in the garden during sunny autumn days; other trees with large leaves such as Acer platanoides varieties provide good foliage cover during summer months when you are most likely to be in the garden; and trees with well branches crowns such as Crataegus – hawthorns - give some filtered screening even without leaves and let light in during darker months.

    Finally, pleached trees are another popular screening choice: normally planted in a line on a bamboo framework, and having the effect of a hedge on stilts, these are perfect for above-fence screening in restricted spaces. Tilia species, Carpinus and Pyrus Chanticleer are popular and functional options for pleached trees; you can browse our full range of pleached trees here.

     

    Advice

    Of course, all of this depends on your garden or site and the suitability of trees or hedges for the location – we aim to give the right advice to find a solution for your garden. If you want to talk to any of our friendly team about planning your options give us a call on 01435 862992.

    Or, you can leave us a message on our contact page, and we’ll endeavour to promptly get back to you.

    Thuja Occidentalis Brabant Thuja Occidentalis Brabant
    Pyrus calleryana Chanticleer Pyrus calleryana Chanticleer
  • Summer time tips from English Woodlands

    July and August is not an ideal time for tree planting. However, the summer months are great for simply enjoying a garden in full bloom, complemented by glorious sunshine; the summer time is also a good time to start planning for autumn!

    Summer trees for shade

    Prominent trees featured in towns and cities are particularly welcome as the temperatures start to soar. Adding much needed shade to the streets and softening the outline of buildings, trees add a certain beauty with their foliage and form. Parks form ‘green lungs’ in built-up areas and transform high streets into attractive avenues. So enjoy the feel good factor of trees wherever they are this summer!

    Some of our favourites trees for shade include:

    Other plants to enjoy

    Moreover, there are many plants to enjoy around a patio or pool in summer include olives, figs, palms and bamboos. Have a good look around the garden to see what foliage colours and shapes you could add. Green is restful, gold and burgundy foliage can be added as a highlight, and variegated plants love the sun!

    Top tips

    If you are going on holiday this time of year, remember newly planted trees and shrubs need watering so do make arrangements for this with your neighbours or friends if you are going away!

    Some more top tips for what to do during summer include:

    • Tie in and train new growth on climbers such as Wisteria and Clematis
    • Prune new growth on apple and pear trees to retain shape and encourage fruiting side shoots next year.
    • Trim all topiary plants, such as bay, to keep them in a neat shape – and feed them if they are in containers.
    • Make sure you keep watering all your newly planted trees and shrubs!

     

    Looking good in the nursery just now:

    hydrangea Hydrangea
    imperata cylindrica Imperata Cylindrica
    phyllostachys vivax aureocaulis Phyllostachys vivax aureocaulis

    If you want to find out more about the products listed above, then just let us know. Visit our contact page to find out how to get in touch.

  • Evergreen Flowering Plants for the Summer

    Evergreen trees, shrubs and climbers add structure and foliage interest all year round, and if they flower too they are really earning their keep! If you have a wall to cover or a statement to make there are some great plants in flower just now.

    We thought we’d share with you some of the cream of the crop, available at either the English Woodlands nursery or online.

    Firstly, Evergreen Magnolia – Magnolia grandiflora, we also sell the variety ‘Goliath’ which flowers when younger than the species.

    Retaining its deep, glossy leaves throughout the year, evergreen Magnolia can flower from July throughout the summer, and if mild into the autumn too. It has large creamy flowers, which are delicately fragrant.

    Magnolia grandiflora was traditionally grown in sheltered walled gardens or against a house and enjoys a sunny site protected from cold wind. It makes a stunning stand alone specimen and is prunable, but at the expense of some flowers.

    Magnolia grandiflora Goliath Flower

    Our Trachelospermum jasminoides – know as the ‘Star Jasmine’ – is not, in fact, a jasmine, as you might expect.

    This climber has very fragrant white flowers reminiscent of jasmine and given some support will climb and screen walls and fences.

    It does best in well-drained soil and a sunny site, the star jasmine can reach an ultimate height of 7 metres. If this is too high for your liking, don’t worry: you can keep it contained in a smaller space, while the plant can be pruned, if need be. If you do need to prune however, be careful, as the stems and leaves exude a milky juice when cut.

    Trachelospermum jasminoides

    Finally, another impressive container plant currently in season is Nandina domestica, also called heavenly bamboo although it is definitely not a bamboo!

    These are erect, evergreen shrubs with elegant green foliage, which colour well throughout the entirety of summer and autumn. With panicles of white flowers appearing in mid-summer, nandina domestica eventually sports bright red berries, growing to an ultimate height of 2 metres, with a 1.5 metre spread. Nandina is slow growing and is an attractive plant for a pot on a patio – ideal in courtyard gardens too.

    Nandina flowering

    As ever, if you wish to discuss the plants featured here, or any that we have available in stock, don’t hesitate to get in touch!

  • What to do with fruit trees during the ‘June Drop’

    Now we’re halfway through June, owners of fruit trees may have noticed the fruit starting to drop off from the trees.

    Commonly known as the ‘June Drop’, the early summer sees fruit trees flowering to the extent that they naturally shed some of their produce.

    english woodlands fruit trees

    This is usually caused by either an excessive fruit load, whereby there is a surplus amount of fruit that becomes too heavy for a tree to carry.

    Other causes tend to be that a tree has limited carbohydrate resources and needs to lose fruit to respire properly, or even turbulent weather conditions. Another major cause of damaged fruit, unsuitable for a crop, is inadequate cultivation, and this is something that you can rectify yourself.

    Pruning to allow the tree’s branches, in order for it to access more light, is one method that gardeners may want to try.

    Another useful method is to thin your fruit (i.e. manually removing any surplus) in order to help immature trees to conserve energy. Instead this energy will be spent on developing roots, foliage and branches, meaning the tree will have a better foundation to harvest in future years. Certainly, it is important that a specimen does not expend too much energy in a year’s crop, lest it affect the next year’s produce.

    Pruning and thinning benefits the remaining fruits, allowing them to develop to the right size, and allowing them good access to sunlight and oxygen.

    When it comes to apple or pear trees, you will want to remove any fruit that has an odd shape, position, or that are damaged in any way. Within any given cluster, there will often be a ‘king’ fruit that has all of these attributes, and will definitely need removing right away. Make sure you use secateurs or long scissors for the job, or you can twist them off by hand if that’s easier.

    Plums have a habit of over-cropping too, but are easy to thin out with a thumb and forefinger; leave out one pair every 15cm.

    If your fruit has already started dropping, you will want to get started thinning and pruning, maintaining the trees as you see fit until mid-July.

    If you have any questions or queries on best pruning and thinning practices, don’t hesitate to contact us. If you’re hoping to buy fruit trees then we have pear, apple, cherry, plum trees and more available online, in our fruit trees category.

    Furthermore, if you would like to purchase any of our hedges, shrubs, accessories, or trees for gardens, then feel free to browse the site to view our comprehensive selection.

  • June Promotion: Save 20% on Box Topiary and 10% on Box Hedge Plants

    During June, we are running a promotion on selected Buxus sempervirens, or Box as it is more commonly known - a classic and deservedly popular plant.

    Although June is not traditionally the planting season for trees or shrubs, container grown plants can be planted at any time of year as long as the soil is still moist, and you can water them during the summer after planting. Box is very popular as topiary as well as hedge plants, they are evergreen, slow growing and are easily maintained by pruning – traditionally during June.

    Box has traditionally been used as a low hedge around vegetable and rose gardens and formal herbaceous borders – all usually at their best in June. Topiary box balls and cones can also be used effectively in containers by entrances, on patios and balconies. Box is tolerant of shade and most well-drained soils. Like any plants if you keep box in containers do feed them during the growing season!

    At English Woodlands we stock a range of container grown hedge plants and topiary, and we are offering two promotions this month.

    To activate this discount, you will want to activate the following codes when at the checkout:

    10% off all Box hedging code: BOXHEDGE10

    AND

    20% off all Box topiary code: BOXTOP20

    To view all of the Box plants on offer this month, you can visit our promotions page now. For any further information, please call us on 01435 862882

    box topiary plantsbox plants

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