01435 862 992
        English Woodlands
01435 862 992

Open:

You have no items in your shopping basket.

Subtotal: £0.00
Current price view

Tag Archives: English Woodlands

  • Sussex Heritage Trust Award

    Highly CommendedWe are very pleased to announce that our customer service building has won a 'Highly Commended' in the Sussex Heritage Trust Awards commercial category entered by English Heritage Buildings.

    The competition was high so this is great news! The judge's comments were “A simple design, well executed in a delightful working environment.  An impressive modern building constructed from oak and slate.”

    We have had very positive feedback so far from customers and staff alike, so well done to English Heritage Buildings.

  • See us at the Woodfair this weekend!

    Come and see us at the Bentley Woodfair this weekend!

    Friday 23rd to Sunday 25th September

     

    We will be on the Bentley Lawn stand A15 as usual!

  • Varieties of native ornamental cherries

    March is the time when early ornamental cherries start coming out in blossom (in  previous blogs we’ve highlighted some of the earliest of these varieties). While there are an abundance of lovely ornamental cherry trees to choose from, we’d like to introduce you to two particularly pleasing cherry trees that you may not be so familiar with:

    Prunus avium Plena – the double white flowering variety of wild cherry

    Prunus avium Plena Prunus avium Plena

    This is a medium-sized tree that eventually reaches a height of 8-12m. It has a 4-6m spread with a rounded and regularly branched crown. While it has glossy bark and leaves turn orange-yellow in the autumn, it is arguably more attractive in the spring, with pendulous bundles of double snow-white flowers in April to early May.

    The flowers are sterile, and hence do not produce fruit. Generally undemanding of soil type as long as it is well drained, this ornamental cherry is chalk tolerant and an ideal park and avenue tree that also suits medium to large gardens.

    While not as flamboyant as some of the Japanese ornamental cherries, we recommend Prunus avium Plena as a stunning, graceful tree which will fit neatly into a naturalistic garden or a woodland setting.

    Prunus padus Watereri bird cherry

    Prunus padus Watereri Prunus padus Watereri

    A fast growing cherry tree, Prunus padus Watereri ultimately reaches a 10m height and spread. One of its most distinct characteristics are its unusual, fragrant white flowers, which appear in May and hang in long pendulous racemes. This tree’s blue-ish green coloured matt leaves also transform into a fine shade of yellow in autumn.

    Managing to be very hardy and tolerant of a wide range of soil types, Prunus can also tolerate temporary drought as well as wetter soils, this tree can cope where other cherry trees may not thrive.

    The tree produces pea sized cherries in late summer that, while edible, tend to have a bitter taste, hence the cherries are usually reserved for use in preserves in some parts of Europe.

    Nevertheless, as a long-lasting medium to large ornamental cherry tree, Prunus padus Watereri can ultimately be used to great effect in amenity plantings, large gardens and in open naturalistic settings.

    As ever, if these native ornamental cherries are of interest, please feel free to contact us for more information and advice!

  • Trees and shrubs for windy sites - Crataegus – Hawthorns

    Commonly called Hawthorns in Britain, Crataegus is originally a Greek name, Krataigos, which refers to the strength of the hawthorn’s hard wood.

    There are many varieties of Crataegus, featuring broad as well as lobed leaves. Aside from the native hawthorn, which produces thick hedges, there are also ornamental varieties of crataegus that can make for some lovely garden trees, due to the variety of flower colour on show – some feature good autumn colour too.

    One of the hardiest native trees is the Crataegus monogyna (or the common hawthorn), which is often seen wind pruned and durable; coping in exposed sites where other plants would suffer. Hawthorns are also notable for being able to tolerate a wide range of soil conditions, as long as the soil is not in drastically poor condition.

    Naturally, if left to grow as a tree, the hawthorn can reach heights of up to 6m (depending on the site). This, along with its dense branching pattern, means that hawthorn trees are generally good for screening.

    Traditionally used for hedging, either just as a single species or mixed with other plants, it is thorny and bushy enough to be made stock proof.

    The flowers of the crataegus monogyna in May/June are an important source of nectar for insects and the red berries (or haws), an important food source for birds and small mammals in autumn and winter.

    Finally, Hawthorns can regenerate effectively when cut back to the ground.

    Examples of Ornamental Hawthorns:

    Crataegus laevigata ‘Paul’s Scarlet’

    A small round headed tree that can ultimately grow to up 4-8m in height, with scarlet pink flowers in spring and small round haws in autumn.

    crataegus pauls scarlet 400

    Crataegus alba Plena

    A similar round-headed tree like the Paul’s Scarlet, but with double white flowers which age to pink.

    crat mono 400

    Crataegus prunifolia Splendens

    A small round headed tree ultimately 5-7m in height, broad glossy leaves which turn, gold, orange and red in autumn at the same time as the plentiful berries that ripen to bright red. Good for screening. A real gem.

    crataegus prunifolia splendens 400

  • Evergreen Specimen Conifers – The English Woodlands January Offer

    At this time of year, gardens can look a little bleak, so the value of evergreens, and particularly stately specimens such as conifers, are obvious. We like to make sure our promotions reflect this, and that’s why we’ll be offering a full 20% off any purchases of evergreen specimen conifers throughout the month of January. Just enter the code JAN14 at checkout to claim the promotional discount for yourself.

    Autumn to spring is an ideal planting time, we supply specimen conifers as mature plants in containers that can be planted anytime conditions are suitable. Whenever you plant, this is the time of year to appreciate them. Conifers can add a focal point in a large medium or small garden, depending on the variety. They add form, foliage detail and colour to a winter garden.

    There’s a wide variety in stock this month, starting with larger plants like the distinctive, pencil-shaped Juniper Skyrocket, now only £91.20 for a 200-250cm tree.  For a smaller specimen the slow-growing Korean Fir (Abies Koreana) is discounted to only £44.20 for an 80-100cm plant, though with an ultimate height as great as 10 metres.

     Korean Fir

    The Korean Fir, displaying green, narrow needles with a silvery underside

    You may also want to take a look at Pinus sylvestris, or the Scots Pine. Read more about it in our previous blog, it is a justifiably popular tree – quick growing, wind tolerant and native to the British Isles. A hardy conifer with an initially pyramid-like shape, it eventually spreads to more of an umbrella shape, at an ultimate height of anywhere between ten and thirty metres.

    There’s plenty more on offer, from the Himalayan and Blue Atlas Cedars, to Redwoods and Cypress trees. Just use the code JAN14 at checkout to claim your promotional 20% discount.

    As ever, if you’d like to know more about our current and upcoming offers, stock, trade enquiries, or would simply like some advice on plant choice and planting technique, don’t hesitate to contact us at any time.

5 Item(s)